Indigo Imp Brewery Ltd.

Small Batches

The Indigo Imp brews seven barrels at a time. This is a relatively small amount for a production brewery but allows us to make quality a priority. It also allows us to keep a constant eye on the beers we are brewing and be able to add a seasonal or one time special brew on a whim.

Indigo Imp has green initiatives too. Imp reuses water from the brewing process for cleaning when possible. Imp beer bottles are recyclable, so please recycle. All spent grains are used by a local farmer to feed cows.

Open Fermentation

Indigo Imp beers are fermented in open fermentation tanks. This helps create the flavors that make Indigo Imp beers unique. With open fermentation, each batch may be influenced by wild yeast in addition to the yeast added by the brewer, resulting in slight flavor variations from batch to batch and season to season. The fermentors are long, wide and relatively shallow. This is different than the tall, cylindro-conical tanks typically used in brewing. As the yeast proliferates and rises to the top of the tank, like all ale yeast does, it travels a shorter distance and spends less time in contact with the beer leaving unique flavors and esters.

These factors generally produce fruity, ester-like, and sometimes even a bit sour flavor, which when combined with the malt and hops, creates a truly unique and delicious beer.

Green Initiatives

All spent grains are used by a local farmer to feed cows. Imp reuses water from the brewing process for cleaning when possible. Imp beer bottles are recyclable, so please recycle. We recycle any used materials that can not be re-used in a future brewing process, such as cardboard or bottles.

What is Real Ale?

Real Ale is the very first kind of beer that was produced in sealed containers. It is a beer that has been naturally carbonated in the container from which it is served. The best example of Real Ale production is a traditional English cask (the old fashioned beer barrel that has a spigot on the front).

Newly fermented beer is placed in the cask with a small amount of priming sugar or unfermented beer and then sealed with a bung. During the next weeks, a secondary fermentation takes place in the cask and the resulting carbon dioxide is absorbed into the beer giving the beer natural carbonation. The same process is used for bottles and the result is a beer that has all the flavor it was intended and a smooth carbonation that is not sharp or metallic like some artificially carbonated beers.